In our modern world where we expect almost immediate gratification, waiting for a ferry to cross a river may seem old-fashioned. The St. Johns River Ferry is in danger of being discontinued and may disappear from history. Currently, the ferry is the last ferry being operated by the State of Florida. We think discontinuing this service would be a big loss to Florida and our nation.

Please send a message to the Governor of Florida if you think the ferry is a great part of the experience of north Florida and should be continued.

Contact the Florida Governor

Select categories: Transportation or Tourism


The St. Johns River Ferry crosses the St. Johns and connects Mayport to St. Georges Island. The ferry also connects Highway A1A on both sides. Today, modern highways and bridges carry most of the traffic around the two points and cross the river further upstream from its mouth.

While in Atlantic Beach, we had searched for information about the ferry and its schedule and costs, but found nothing. I asked at the front desk of the Sea Turtle Inn and the young lady did not have any information.

As we were leaving Atlantic Beach, we had already taken the 'modern' route and were headed to Amelia Island and Fernandina when we saw the sign for the ferry and pulled off to investigate.


No one was in the ferry loading lot and we wondered if the ferry was still running? There had been a sign that read, "Ferry loads by Lane" so, I drove up to the first spot in lane 1. We got out to see if we could determine if the ferry was still running.

We went over and saw a sign that listed the fees and schedule. It said the ferry basically ran every 30 minutes (this was valid on July 10, 2007), so we figured that we must have just missed the boat (done that before!) and spent the next few minutes looking around. The cost was $3.25 for the trip, which we thought was very reasonable.

Soon a car pulled up behind us and another and another. Well, either the ferry was running or we were starting something!


As it turned out, the ferry arrived in a few minutes and we were first onto the boat heading for Mayport! We had never done this before and this was exciting! I looked up ahead to see if there was a gate or something to stop us in case the brakes failed, etc.

Far enough! It was a similar to getting the best seat in the house or sitting in the front row of a roller coaster. Here, the fare collector makes sure we are stopping.


They load the ferry fairly quickly and the next thing you know, you are on your way.

We sat here in our car enthralled with the view. We were crossing the historic St. Johns River and sitting in our car. It was really a great experience.

And just a few minutes earlier, we had wondered if the ferry was still running! We had gotten our answer.


As the ferry came into Mayport, it had to 'crab' and point its bow upstream to counter the strong current. As a result, it gave us a great view next door of Singleton's Seafood Shack, the place where we would eat a good lunch.

This guy greets the ferry in Mayport and is a real character. He comes out laughing, joking and greeting everyone while he joins the ramp with the ferry.


As we finished our meal, we rushed next door to catch the ferry and ended up being the last to board this time. So, we got out and walked around and enjoyed the views on the short trip.



Every wonder the origin of the word 'accounting'? Here the Captain of the ferry can be seen 'a counting' the vehicles on this load.


The Mayport shrimp boat fleet docks next door to the Seafood Shack.


Shrimp boats and Pelicans


Approaching the St. George Island dock. Since it is last-on-last-off, we had plenty of time to stand on the bow of the ferry and watch it dock before we needed to drive off. What a round trip! We had been driving along to our destination, saw the ferry, took it over to Mayport for a good lunch at Singleton's Seafood Shack and now were back on our way all within an hour.

Unfortunately, the ferry's budget may be slashed and the ferry discontinued.


We think discontinuing this service would be a big loss to Florida and our nation.

Please send a message to the Governor of Florida if you think the ferry is a historic part of the experience of northern Florida and should be continued.

Contact the Florida Governor

Select categories: Transportation or Tourism



©2007 Earl Cook